America’s National Parks Podcast
Restoring the Everglades

Restoring the Everglades

March 8, 2021

One and a half million acres of shallow-water marine habitats, freshwater marshes and prairies, saltwater wetland forests, and pine and hardwood forests provide refuge for threatened and endangered animals in the Gulf of Mexico. The green sea turtle, American crocodile, West Indian manatee, Everglade snail kite, and piping plover all depend on critical habitat within Everglades National Park. 1.3 million acres of the park is designated wilderness, making it the largest subtropical wilderness in the United States and the largest wilderness area east of the Mississippi River.

100.Years of Hot Springs, New Filming Rules | National Park News

100.Years of Hot Springs, New Filming Rules | National Park News

February 28, 2021

Visitor statistics have been released for 2020, and visitation to parks was down about 1/3, thanks to park closures. There's a new National Park Service app, new rules for anyone taking video in parks, and Hot Springs National Park is about to celebrate a huge milestone. 

Scandal and Special People of Effigy Mounds

Scandal and Special People of Effigy Mounds

February 20, 2021

More than a thousand years ago in the Upper Midwest, indigenous people were moving mountains—literally. The Mound Builders changed the landscape by piling earth into tall shapes that could only be truly appreciated from up above. In our time, one Ho-Chunk woman lived a special life in this area, and one National Park Service superintendent went to prison for stealing the bones of her ancestors. 

100 Years at Mount Rainier

100 Years at Mount Rainier

February 15, 2021

This week on America's National Parks, a great mountain of the west, and conservation lessons learned over the course of a century. 

Digging Up Dinosaurs

Digging Up Dinosaurs

February 5, 2021

Much of the western United States was once blanketed in hundreds of feet of sand. The unforgiving sun beat down on the landscape for 20 to 30 million years during the early Jurassic period. Thin layers of rock allowed water to collect even in the dry desert, though sometimes it was hidden a few inches below the surface. Dinosaurs and other animals were able to survive the harsh conditions, and as the sand slowly turned to sandstone, traces of these animals were caught and preserved in the rock, creating fossils.

More than 150 million years later, a man named Earl Douglass was born in Medford, Minnesota in 1862. He didn’t know it yet, but his fate was already entwined with the dinosaurs that once roamed the earth.

This week on America’s National Parks: Earl Douglass and Dinosaur National Monument.

Mask Mandate, Commercial Filming Permits Struck Down | National Park News

Mask Mandate, Commercial Filming Permits Struck Down | National Park News

January 30, 2021

It's time for this month's "news from the parks" episode. Today, we cover President Biden's new executive order requiring masks-wearing on federal lands, and a landmark ruling from a judge striking down the National Park Service's commercial film permit rules. 

Wolves of Isle Royale

Wolves of Isle Royale

January 26, 2021

With wolves decreasing at Isle Royale, the moose population could decimate the forest and vegetation communities. Neither species is native to the island, but a multi-agency wolf translocation strategy may save Isle Royale. 

Little American Island

Little American Island

January 16, 2021

Swirling between the borders of Canada and Minnesota is a vast maze of interconnected water highways – a wild space comprised of lush forests and isolated islands. Its history is fueled by the Native Americans who called it home, and the french fur traders known as Voyageurs. Peaceful islands dot the waters, but they also hold a secret. A golden secret. On this episode of America's National Parks - the story of Voyageur's National Park's Little American Island and the 1890's Gold Rush.

St. Croix Heroes and Mussels

St. Croix Heroes and Mussels

January 10, 2021

In the heart of our nation lies a riverway that has been federally protected for more than 50 years and stewarded by Native Americans for thousands of years before that. ItThis river carried logs piled so high they caused jams two miles long. It witnessed the first steamboats, a Minnesota firestorm, and even a briefly booming pearl button factory. The onset of the fur trade, European settlement, and urban development began to threaten these once-pristine waters. The unique habitat for aquatic life and recreational opportunities such as fishing and paddling was enough cause for people to rally for the water’s protection.

 

This week on America’s National Parks: the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway.

The Steel Driving Man

The Steel Driving Man

January 5, 2021

If you take the time to stop in West Virginia's New River Gorge, our newest national park, and listen, you may hear intertwined within the sound of birdsong, flowing water, and the wind billowing through the trees the whistle of a train. Today on America's National Parks, the legend born from the Gorge that would echo through generations to come. A man named John Henry. 

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