America’s National Parks Podcast
How a National Park Becomes a World Heritage Site

How a National Park Becomes a World Heritage Site

May 18, 2020

While exploring National Parks, Monuments and historic sites across the country, you may have noticed gigantic plaques in a few of the visitor centers, designating them as UNESCO World Heritage sites. Today on America's National Parks, we explore what makes these sites special, and what it takes for an exceptional place to become a World Heritage Site.

The Great Humanitarian

The Great Humanitarian

May 9, 2020

Herbert Hoover had been president for less than a year when the stock market crashed. At the next election, he was swept out out the white house and out of public life as a scapegoat that would forever be saddled with a legacy of a presidential disaster. It's time to set the record straight.

Today on America's National Parks, the Herbert Hoover that maybe you didn't know, and his National Park legacy.

White Nose Syndrome

White Nose Syndrome

May 2, 2020

The National Park Service manages 84 million acres, in 419 parks, 1 in 4 of which have caves, and 1 in 3 of which have mines. Many of these caves and mines provide habitat for hibernating bats.

Bats are an essential part of many American ecosystems, but they're under threat from a hidden illness called white-nose syndrome. Since 2006, this fungal disease has killed millions of bats in North America. In some caves and mines, 90-100% of bat populations have died.

Parks in more than half of the United States are affected by the presence of White Nose Syndrom. Losing an important predator so quickly may have a drastic effect on the ecology of a given park. As the disease spreads, scientists consider the impact and potential for impact on national parks to be very high.

Today on America's National Parks, Bats of the Greater Yellowstone area - and how National Park Service scientists are working to learn how to protect them.

National Park Week Throwback Thursday: Other Great National Park Podcasts

National Park Week Throwback Thursday: Other Great National Park Podcasts

April 23, 2020

This week, we're doing something a little different. It's National Park Week, and we're teaming up with other National Park podcasters, authors, bloggers, and other content creators to celebrate. 

The theme for Today, Thursday, April 23rd is "Throwback Thursday," so a few of us podcasts decided to band together for a "best-of" sort of episode. We're going to play you a clip each from, Gaze at the National Parks, Everybody's National Parks, Parklandia, and America's National Parks.

These throwback episodes are some of our favorites. We hope you enjoy.

Dust of the Earth

Dust of the Earth

April 18, 2020

 

Known as "John of the Mountains" and "Father of the National Parks," legendary naturalist John Muir was far ahead of his time, holding ideals that many are just coming around to.

Muir undertook a daring adventure in 1867 that led him to the path of natural enlightenment. He decided that he wanted to explore the world. He left his life in Indiana and walked one thousand miles to Florida. Muir trekked south through Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida with little more than a map, a compass, a brush, soap, and a change of underclothes. 

Muir later penned his adventure in "A Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf," which has become a classic naturalist text set against the backdrop of the post-civil war south. In it, he makes loads of prescient observations, but none more arresting than his denunciation of the idea that God mad nature as man's personal resource factory. That perhaps, the creator mad nature for nature's sake, and the lives and feelings of every plant and animal matter just as much as our own.

Angel of the Battlefield

Angel of the Battlefield

April 11, 2020

In this difficult time in the world, we look to heroes from our past as inspiration to help us find the resolution to possess even a small fraction of their helping spirit. Clara Barton's life's work has rippled through the generations, and, in fact, the response to today's pandemic crisis might have been very different were she never born.

Today, one of the most decorated women in American history, and the Clara Barton National Historic Site.

The Return of the Wolves

The Return of the Wolves

April 5, 2020

In the battle for conservation and the protection and reinvigoration of endangered species, one animal serves as a symbol to remind us of what we've done as a human race, and how we have the responsibility to fix our mistakes. And it all played out in America's first and most famous National Park.

Today on America's National Parks, Yellowstone, and the 25th anniversary of the return of the Grey Wolf.

Oh Shenandoah

Oh Shenandoah

March 28, 2020

Just 75 miles from the bustle of Washington, D.C., is an escape to recreation and re-creation. Cascading waterfalls, spectacular vistas, and quiet wooded hollows - 200,000 acres of protected lands are a haven to deer, songbirds, and the night sky. But the history of this land is also the history of the people who gave up their homes for a great national park in the East.

Today on America's National Parks, Shenandoah, and the livelihood of the people who called the mountains their home.

News from the Parks | March 2020

News from the Parks | March 2020

March 23, 2020

As travel restrictions, shelter-in-place orders, and closures to all but the most essential services sweep the country, the National Park Service has been caught in the middle of wanting to protect people and places, while providing recreational opportunities for Americans to get out and free their minds in nature.

Going to the Sun

Going to the Sun

March 14, 2020

Only a few miles of rough wagon roads existed within Glacier National Park when Congress established the park on May 11, 1910. Many people, including the first Park Superintendent, William R. Logan, wanted to build a transmountain road across the park. Supporters argued that a good road system would enable people to reach the interior of the park even if they could not afford the rates of the Great Northern Railroad and its chalets. And enthusiasm for good roads and automobiling had infected National Park Service officials as much as the rest of the country. But sheer cliffs, short construction seasons, sixty foot snow-drifts, and tons of solid rock made the idea of building a road across the Continental Divide a unique challenge.

Today on America's National Parks, Glacier's Going to the Sun Road.