America’s National Parks Podcast
Spring Migration in the Parks

Spring Migration in the Parks

May 16, 2021

Point Reyes National Seashore has recorded more than 450 species of birds, including 38 that are threatened or endangered. There are multiple factors that make it such a popular and birdy destination. For one, it has many unique habitats that provide food and shelter, such as coastline, forest, wetland, and open fields. The park’s peninsula also juts out into the ocean, scooping migrants into the park as they travel along the coast. Due to these special features, the National Audubon Society has also named it an Important Bird Area.

Restore Hetch Hetchy

Restore Hetch Hetchy

May 9, 2021

It might not be common knowledge that the Yosemite Valley one of the crown jewels of the American landscape, known for towering natural splendor in its pristine condition, has a sister valley, within the National Park, that was flooded to create a water reservoir for the city of San Fransisco. 

For over 100 years, Hetch Hetchy canyon, named with an indigenous word for a type of wild grass, has been called Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. And while turning back is a real possibility one day, Hetch Hetchy is still an amazing place to visit. Or it would be if it were a little easier. 

Restore Hetch Hetchy is an organization with a plan to do just that, and Executive Director Spreck Rosekrans is our guest today on the America's National Parks Podcast.

Driverless Shuttles, Murder in Hot Springs, Pike Trail | National Park News

Driverless Shuttles, Murder in Hot Springs, Pike Trail | National Park News

May 2, 2021

Driverless National Park Shuttles are being tested, a new national trail is proposed, a homicide at Hot Springs, and more.  It’s time for this month’s news round-up episode of the America’s National Parks podcast.

 

Kalaupapa

Kalaupapa

April 25, 2021

In the late 1800s, Hansen’s disease (also known as leprosy) was reaching epidemic proportions in the Hawaiian islands. Bacteria cause nerve damage in patients and can lead to crippling of the hands and feet, paralysis, and blindness. At the time, there was no cure and no known effective treatment, and health officials had no idea how the disease was spreading. This frightened officials in Hawaii, and in a desperate act to save their native populations, isolation seemed to be the only answer.

On this episode of the America's National Parks Podcast - Kalaupapa National Historical Park. 

National Parks That Need Entry Tickets or Reservations for Summer 2021

National Parks That Need Entry Tickets or Reservations for Summer 2021

April 17, 2021

Some National Parks will require entry reservations this summer — in this episode, we'll tell you which ones, and break down all the details.

The Day it Rained Rocks

The Day it Rained Rocks

April 14, 2021

It was, literally, earth-shaking; so much so that a seismometer thousands of miles away picked up the vibrations. It contained enough force to push debris a mile under water, heaving it uphill onto the opposite shore, and generate a tsunami high enough to rival Seattle’s Space Needle.

But this was no earthquake.

Today on America's National Parks, they Icy Bay Landslide, a 60-second deluge of boulders, earth, and trees in a remote slice of Alaska’s Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve on October 17, 2015.

Protecting Alaska for Generations to Come

Protecting Alaska for Generations to Come

April 8, 2021

One of the most significant land conservation measures in our nation’s history was an act that protected over 100 million acres of land, doubled the size of the country’s national refuge system, and tripled wilderness areas. It created or expanded nine national parks and preserves, six national monuments, sixteen national wildlife refuges, twenty-five wild and scenic rivers, and two national forests, including our nation’s largest: the Tongass in Southeast Alaska. This legislation also created a compromise between the needs of development and conservation and the competing interests that fought for them. While it was not perfect, it has shaped the history of our public lands and the National Park Service system itself.

This week on America’s National Park: the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, or ANILCA. 

Yellowstone Boosts Cell Service, Glacier East Opens, Condors Return to Redwood | National Park News

Yellowstone Boosts Cell Service, Glacier East Opens, Condors Return to Redwood | National Park News

March 28, 2021

A collared Yellowstone wolf has been killed...by the governor of Montana, Yellowstone is seeking to improve communication services, Glacier National Park has re-opened the East entrance after over a year of closure, a man is sentenced for stealing over $3000 from Grand Canyon, Wind Cave tours resume, and more. All on this episode of National Park News. Public comment on the Yellowstone communications plan can be submitted here: parkplanning.nps.gov/fiberEA

Community Science in National Parks

Community Science in National Parks

March 21, 2021

 

Hundreds of thousands of people around the world are spending their free time counting birds, measuring water quality, or monitoring pollinators. They may also be counting asteroids, collecting bugs, measuring air quality, reporting wildlife sightings, or tracking monarch migration. The amazing thing is that these people are not career scientists. They live in the city and in the country, go backpacking or have picnics in the park. They vary in age and it doesn’t matter what their job is. They are community scientists.

 

Community science is the practice of data collection by everyday people, that is, people who aren’t scientists. Community scientists volunteer their time to help collect data, analyze results, and solve problems about important issues facing our natural world, and that includes our national parks.

 

Sometimes, the best and easiest way to collect data is to involve volunteers. For example, if a park manager needs to know what areas of the park need better protection, they may need to know where rare plants are blooming each year. A mobile app can support volunteer scientists to record when they see those flowers, and if hundreds of people get involved in the project, there will be more data than if the single scientist tried to explore the entire park alone. This can also be a great way for visitors to learn, get excited, and be involved in something important. By taking part in real science in the park, visitors can learn to appreciate their national parks in new ways. 

 

This week, on America’s National Parks Podcast, we’re exploring stories of community science in our national parks.

 

Lindsey Taylor's blog: https://curiositychroniclesblog.wordpress.com/

The Battle of Bunker Hill

The Battle of Bunker Hill

March 16, 2021

On June 17, 1775, New England soldiers faced the British army for the first time in a pitched battle. Bloody fighting took place throughout a hilly landscape of fenced pastures that were situated across the Charles River from Boston. Though the British were victorious, the psychological toll inflicted by American soldiers from Massachusetts, Connecticut, and New Hampshire was staggering. Of the 2,400 British Soldiers and Marines engaged, 1,000 were wounded or killed.

Today on America's National Parks, the Battle of Bunker Hill, and the Bunker Hill Monument, part of the Boston National Historical Park. 
 

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